Michigan Tech Magazine, December 2004
Printable Version (PDF)
January 30, 2014
News
1. Alum Explores a Mystery (and a Curse?)

2. Michigan Tech Hosts Exxon Mobil VP on the Future of Energy

Entertainment and Enrichment
3. "The Rose and the Rime" Coming to Tech

Seminars and Workshops
4. Environmental Engineering Graduate Seminar

5. MEEM Faculty Candidate Seminar

Regular Features
6. In the News

7. On the Road

8. CTL tip of the Week

1. Alum Explores a Mystery (and a Curse?)
by Dennis Walikainen, senior editor

Marty Lagina made his living through natural resource exploration. Then the 1977 Michigan Tech alumnus and Michigan native did some unnatural exploring to solve a 200 to 500 year old mystery.

Featured on the History Channel, Lagina, his family and friends attempted to solve the “Curse of Oak Island,” based on the legend of a Nova Scotia island. You can catch the latest episode Sundays at 10 p.m. Eastern.

“I’m the skeptic,” says Lagina. “My brother, Rick, is the optimist, but I’m the engineer who needs more proof.“

Read the full news story.

2. Michigan Tech Hosts Exxon Mobil VP on the Future of Energy
William "Bill" Colton, vice president for corporate strategic planning at Exxon Mobil, will give two talks at Michigan Tech this week. The programs are sponsored by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Student Chapter and are open to the public.

The first presentation is about the future of energy. Colton will discuss "The Outlook for Energy: the View to 2040," from 5 to 6 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 30 in Fisher 135.

His second program is titled "How to Move Up in Life: What I wish someone had told me when I was 21." It is scheduled for 3 p.m., Friday, Jan. 31 in the MUB. Refreshments will be served.

Colton has worked with Exxon Mobil for 39 years, including eight years in Tokyo and Bangkok. Currently, he oversees the corporation's strategic planning activities, including assessment of global energy trends.

3. "The Rose and the Rime" Coming to Tech
The Tech Theatre Company presents “The Rose and Rime,” a spectacular, modern fairy tale of courage and hope in the face of adversity and fear. The fable features Rose, a very special girl who embarks on an adventure to save her town, Radio Falls, Michigan, from perpetual winter. The play will be performed in the McArdle Theatre, in the Walker Arts and Humanities Center at Michigan Tech, Thursday to Saturday, Feb. 6 to 8 and Feb. 13 to 15, at 7:30 pm.

General admission is $13, youth tickets (17 and under) are $8, and Michigan Tech student tickets are free with the Experience Tech Fee. Presented by the Michigan Tech Department of Visual and Performing Arts. To purchase tickets, call 7-2073, go to the Rozsa Center Website, or visit Ticketing Operations at Michigan Tech’s Student Development Complex (SDC).

4. Environmental Engineering Graduate Seminar
Kathy Halvorsen (SS/SFRES) will be hosting a seminar, "The Socioecological Sustainability of Forest-based Bioenergy." The talk will take place on Monday, Feb. 3, from 3 to 4 p.m. in GLRC 202.

5. MEEM Faculty Candidate Seminar
Jian Cai of the University of California, Merced School of Engineering, will be hosting a talk, “High-fidelity thermal radiation models for coal combustion." The seminar will take place Monday, Feb. 3, from 4:10 to 5:10 p.m. in MEEM 111.

6. In the News
David A. Edwards '83 has developed the oPhone--a mobile phone that sends scented text messages ("o" = olfactory). His invention was featured on NPR's All Things Considered, Wired and the Daily Mail .

7. On the Road
John Kiefer, a research engineer at the Center for Technology and Training (CTT), recently presented at Purdue University for Indiana’s County Bridge Conference. He spoke to over 200 conference attendees about Michigan’s transportation asset management process, which aims to reduce the cost of maintaining transportation infrastructure. The CTT works with the state to educate public agencies by developing and conducting training programs like the new Bridge Asset Management Program, which provides training for efficiently maintaining bridge infrastructure.

8. CTL tip of the Week

Experimental Education Environment (E3)

The Experimental Education Environment (E3) is a new space meant to support all Michigan Tech instructors’ experimentation with instructional designs, use of instructional technology or educational media, and room or furniture arrangement. As a collaboration among the staff of the Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning, Information Technology’s Media Services and the Van Pelt and Opie Library staff, instructors interested in using this space for formal instruction or informal student groups can receive support for their pedagogical ideas or challenges. With its partners, the library has developed this space to encourage faculty innovation as it evolves towards an Information and Learning Commons.

The initial start-up, supported by the Herman Miller Corporation, was based on the ideas of a group of faculty, CTL, IT and library staff and jump-started by a student team under the leadership of Linda Wanless from the School of Technology. For the next year, Wanless will be leading an educational research program in consort with the Herman Miller team to assess the value of the space and instructor and learner satisfaction. The space will also support testing of new technologies, media, or furniture prior to larger-scale use.

Ways to fully maximize use of this space will be developed during the coming year. To begin, a first-come, first-served method will be used so even if your interest is tentative, don’t hesitate to book time now. Refer to the Van Pelt and Opie Library’s Experimental Education Environment webpage for more information about using the room, scheduling, orientation, the research and more.

The CTL Tip of the Week is brought to you by the Jackson Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL). For general information or help with Canvas at Michigan Tech, be sure to visit Canvas One Stop.

Tech Today home Michigan Tech home