Michigan Tech Magazine, December 2004
Printable Version (PDF)
January 26, 2012
News
1. Diane Gilbert Passes

2. Despite Military Drawdown, ROTC Programs in Good Shape

3. 2011 Electronic W-2 Forms Now on Banweb

4. 2012 Annual Information and Security Compliance Survey

Entertainment and Enrichment
5. Khana Khazana Returns to India

6. "Jazz Club Cabaret" at McArdle

Seminars and Workshops
7. SFHI Candidate to Present Seminar

8. Biological Sciences Seminar

Regular Features
9. Job Postings

10. In the News

11. New Funding

1. Diane Gilbert Passes
Diane Gilbert, an administrative aide at Facilities Management, died unexpectedly earlier this month. She was 53 and had been employed at Michigan Tech since 1994.

Over the years, Gilbert worked in McNair Hall, Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences, Computer Science, and, since 1996, Facilities Management.

"She was a fine person and an excellent employee," said John Rovano, director of Facilities.

He added that she was soft-spoken in nature but sure-handed in work. "She was cooperative, learned quickly and was always willing to take on new responsibilities."

In part, Gilbert served as bookkeeper but in practice did accounting work for the department. She also was the unit's safety officer, addressing training and health-related matters as they pertained to safety. In doing this work, she worked with staff and students. As well, she edited Facilities News, the unit's periodic newsletter.

A former colleague, Kelly McLean of GMES, recalled that Gilbert was somebody who was proud and grateful to have a good job at Michigan Tech. "She was a very nice person and wanted to have a simple life," McLean recalled. That included "an appreciation for nature and a love of animals"--Gilbert had a passel of cats and dogs throughout the years.

Sue Sergey, a coworker, added, "She was quiet and kept to herself." Sergey said that Gilbert was a "fashionista" who prided herself on putting together work outfits from second-hand stores. "Her way of recycling," Sergey said. "She looked great and saved a lot of money."

She also fashioned a good reputation and "will definitely be missed," Rovano said.

Gilbert lived in Kearsarge with her husband Larry.

2. Despite Military Drawdown, ROTC Programs in Good Shape
by John Gagnon, promotional writer

The drawdown of America's military force, underway and driven largely by America's departure from Iraq, means less opportunity and more competition for young men and women in ROTC programs nationwide. But Michigan Tech is expected to weather that storm in good shape. "We will buck the trend," says Col. Michael Brothers, commander of the Air Force ROTC program. Adds, Col. James Spence, commander of the Army ROTC program, "Michigan Tech will need to grow, not shrink."

The drawdown, mandated by Congress, began in the Air Force two years ago. "As far as AFROTC at Michigan Tech, I think we've already survived the worst of it," Brothers says. Thus, while the Air Force Academy has cut its positions by a third, the AFROTC program at Tech has doubled over the last four years. "We have more cadets and have increased the number of scholarship dollars," Brothers says.

AFROTC began the fall semester with nearly 100 cadets, more than double since 2007. Scholarship funding is up 60 percent since 2009.

The reason: the very nature of the institution and its prized cadets. "Tech is engineering heavy and academically challenging," Brothers says. "Our students are highly in demand."

Overall, he adds, the Army and Marine Corps will take the brunt of the current drawdown. Nevertheless, Spence says, Tech will fare well.

Tech's academics, he says--in particular programs in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)--"will insulate us from national tightening of scholarship opportunities." Roughly 60 percent of his army cadets are in STEM fields, with 40 percent in engineering.

Spence notes that the military of the day is all about sophisticated communications, vehicle systems and satellite technology. "The army needs people who can manage technology and at the same time lead technology," he says. "The soldier of today must be tech savvy. We're always looking for talented people in the nation. Get them, keep them, and make officers out of them."

Those would be cadets at Tech. They number 70 in Army ROTC and are part of an attractive program that offers tuition, fees and a stipend. Army ROTC, like the Air Force program, brings Michigan Tech about $800,000 per year in federal scholarship funding.

By joining ROTC, cadets commit to four years of active duty and four years of reserve duty. When they fulfill their military obligation, their prospects will remain promising. "Junior military officers are proven leaders," Spence concludes, "and industry loves to recruit and hire them."

3. 2011 Electronic W-2 Forms Now on Banweb
submitted by Payroll Services

W-2 Forms are now available electronically on Banweb. When printing out the form, be sure to select "print" at the bottom of the screen. The "employee W2 instructions," found at the top, provide additional information regarding the data on the W-2. This printed copy is acceptable by the Internal Revenue Service and state tax authorities. Print the number of copies that you will need.

The paper W-2 Forms for those who did not elect to receive them electronically will be mailed by Monday, Jan. 30.

We would still like to encourage individuals to go on Banweb and sign up to receive their W-2 Form electronically in the future, if you haven't already done so. You only need to elect this choice once, and it will remain until you change it. The steps to sign up for receiving your W-2 electronically are as follows:

1. Log on to Banweb.
2. Select "employee services" tab.
3. Select "tax forms."
4. Select "electronic W-2 consent."
5. Read the disclaimer and then select the box that gives "consent to receive W-2 electronically."
6. Submit.

4. 2012 Annual Information and Security Compliance Survey
Michigan Tech is required by federal and state law to maintain the confidentiality, integrity and availability of sensitive information. The Information Security Board of Review (ISBR) was created by President Glenn Mroz to ensure the University's alignment with these regulatory requirements.

In order to protect and secure sensitive information, the University needs help from the campus community to develop and maintain an accurate inventory of its information assets. An information asset is a definable piece of information, stored in any manner which is recognized as "valuable" to the University. This may be a student's name and address file; or it may be research data. All University employees (including full-time, part-time and temporary employees, staff, student workers and contractors) are required to complete this survey.

The data from this survey will be used to help the University create appropriate strategies and controls for stewardship of information assets and to understand and document potential risks to the University should loss of protected information occur. Employees will receive more information about the survey within the next week.

If you have questions regarding this process or the survey, contact Ashley Sudderth, information compliance officer, at 487-0999, or email the Information Security Board of Review at isbr@mtu.edu .

5. Khana Khazana Returns to India
Indian graduate student Abhinav Sharma will cook tasty dishes from his homeland for Khana Khazana (food treasure) on Friday, Jan. 27, at the Memorial Union Food Court.

The ethnic lunch cooked weekly by international students will feature Jabalpuri alu bonde, which is fried spiced mashed potato balls; tawa pulao, a street-food favorite in Mumbai, combining spicy and aromatic rice and vegetables; chicken jalfrezi, a Chinese and Pakastani recipe; and paneer kofta, cheese-stuffed balls in a sweet and spicy sauce.

A full lunch, including a beverage, costs $6. Individual entrees are available for $2 each.

Khana Khazana is a collaborative effort of international students and Dining Services. It is open to the community as well as the campus.

6. "Jazz Club Cabaret" at McArdle
submitted by Bethany Jones, marketing manager, Rozsa

Warm your cold winter bones and nourish your soul with some hot jazz, funk and blues at the Jazz Club Cabaret at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday, Jan. 27 and 28, in the McArdle Theatre.

Mike Irish, director of Jazz Studies, says two dynamic groups--Jaztec and Momentum--will perform.

Irish has a broad background in jazz studies as both an educator and performer.

Jaztec continues in its great tradition of jazz standards and contemporary jazz, with their own creative twist. Mark Maguire, guitar; Caleb Roty, sax; Jack Matheson, bass; Michael Coburn, piano/vibes; and Kyle Frazier, drums have created some wonderful arrangements of well-known tunes.

Momentum features Nick Black, saxes; Laura Black, keyboards; Jacob Posega, bass; and Troy Bouman, drums. They will perform some of the deepest grooves and funkiest tunes in the area.

Irish promises, "Everything on this 'jazz menu' is served fresh and hot!" The shows are different each night.

The McArdle Theatre will offer a mix of its standard seating and club-style tables, and as always, great sound.

Tickets are free for Tech students, $5 for other students and $10 for general admission.

To purchase tickets, call 487-2073, go online at rozsa.tickets.mtu.edu , or visit SDC Ticketing Operations. SDC ticketing hours are 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Friday; 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday; and noon to 9 p.m., Sunday.

The Rozsa Box Office is closed during regular business hours, but for events at the McArdle Theatre, it will be open from 5 to 6 p.m. Tickets will also be available at the McArdle Theatre door, from 6 p.m. to show time, on the night of the events.

7. SFHI Candidate to Present Seminar
Mark Green, a faculty candidate for the Strategic Faculty Hiring Initiative on Water, will present a seminar, "Decreased Water Flowing from a Forest Amended with Calcium Silicate," from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m., Friday, Jan. 27, in Rehki G06.

Green is an assistant professor at the Center for the Environment at Plymouth State University and a research hydrologist at the Northern Research Station of the US Forest Service.

8. Biological Sciences Seminar
Assistant Professor Rupak Rajachar (Biomedical Engineering) will present "Instructive Biomaterials and the Role of Physical and Chemical Cues in Native and Pathologic Tissues" at 2 p.m., Friday, Jan. 27, in Chem Sci 101.

9. Job Postings
Staff job descriptions are available in Human Resources or at http://www.admin.mtu.edu/hro/postings . For more information regarding staff positions, call 487-2280 or email jobs@mtu.edu .

Faculty job descriptions can be found at www.admin.mtu.edu/hro/facpers/facvac.htm . For more information regarding faculty positions, contact the academic department in which the position is posted.

Custodian
(AFSCME internal posting only)
Facilities Management

Software Engineer
Michigan Tech Transportation Institute (MTTI)
Apply online at http://www.jobs.mtu.edu .

Programmer/Analyst
Administrative Information Services
Apply online at http://www.jobs.mtu.edu .

Please note: Human Resources is transitioning to an online application process for the last two job postings above. To read the notice to applicants, please go to http://www.admin.mtu.edu/hro/postings/#STAFF .

Michigan Technological University is an equal opportunity educational institution/equal opportunity employer.

10. In the News
On Tuesday, Jan. 24, the New York Times published the second in a series of "Scientist at Work" reports by Associate Professor John Vucetich (SFRES) about the wolf-moose Winter Study he is conducting at Isle Royale National Park. See Scientist at Work.

11. New Funding
Dean Jacqueline Huntoon (Graduate School) and co-PI Chris Anderson (Institutional Diversity) have received $30,950 from the University of Michigan for a project, "A Planning Grant to Enrich and Enlarge the Michigan AGEP Alliance."

Tech Today home Michigan Tech home